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Hartselle Enquirer

Amendments could make Alabama's Constitution longer

By Staff
Bob Ingram, Alabama Scene
MONTGOMERY–Brace yourself for a king-size ballot when you go to the polls in the November General Election.
In addition to the presidential election and a number of state judicial and local offices to be filled there will also be a laundry list of proposed amendments to the State Constitution–35 of them to be exact.
Eight of the proposals will be voted on statewide, the remainder only in individual counties.
One of the amendments of statewide application is meaningless but of much concern to African-Americans.
It would strike out any reference to segregated schools or to the poll tax.
Both of those provisions have long since been declared null and void by the U. S. Supreme Court, but the fact that the language is still in the Constitution is offensive to many.
Be sure the long list of amendments to the already much-amended constitution will give rise to a chorus of demands for a new constitution.
Already the longest constitution in the nation, it is likely to become even longer after the election.
That some of the amendments border on the ridiculous cannot be denied. For example, one of the proposals seeks to allow the legislature to pass a law to permit local police officers and sheriffs deputies to enforce traffic laws on private roads in gated communities in Shelby County.
Enfinger was unceremoniously dumped last week as Senate floor leader and majority leader, the No. 2 spot in the Senate. He was replaced by Sen. Zeb Little, D-Cullman.
While there was no doubt that Senate President Pro Tem Lowell Barron, D-Fyffe, directed the coup, he let other senators explain why Enfinger was ousted.
Sen. Larry Means, D-Attalla, used words such as "disenchantment" and "unsupportive" in describing Enfinger's contribution to the Democratic caucus.
No doubt Enfinger's verbal assault earlier this year on Sen. Bedford marked the beginning of the end for his role as a Democrat leader.
He dared to say that Bedford had embarrassed the Senate by taking millions of dollars of "pork" to his home district and demanded that he be removed from the chairmanship of a Senate budget committee.
Sen. Little's promotion gave impetuous to speculation that come 2006 he will the Democrat's hope to unseat Republican Atty. Gen. Troy King,
Appearing on a national cable television talk show, Moore was specifically asked if he would ever run for public office again.
His answer: "If I must I must."
That is as close as he has come to saying he will run for office again but left unanswered is what office he might seek. Will he try to regain his old office of Chief Justice or will he make a move for the top job…Governor?
Stay tuned.
His execution was carried out after the U. S. Supreme Court by a 5-4 vote refused to grant a stay and Gov. Bob Riley also refused to grant clemency.
Hubbard was sentenced to death for the 1977 murder of Lillian Montgomery of Tuscaloosa. He had been released from prison only a short time before that crime after serving 19 years for another murder.

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