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Hartselle Enquirer

Return to normalcy

Now that we have endured more than a year of government-imposed mandates related to the COVID19 virus, it’s about time for us to turn our backs to the virus and resume a pre-pandemic normal life. 

How happy will be the day when we can live our lives without fear of contracting a communicable disease that could cause our death.  

Fortunately, some positive steps are being taken by elected officials to do away with post-pandemic protocols. As of Friday, the face mask requirement was lifted by Gov. Kay Ivey. It is no longer a requirement that individuals wear a face mask or face covering when outside the home.  

However, some businesses are indicating their employees will continue to wear masks and are encouraging their customers to do the same, out of a sense of courtesy to others.  

Virus protocols have had their biggest impact on the services and activities of local church congregations. Most larger congregations provided worship services televised on local TV channels while their facilities were closed to in-person attendance.  

Recently churches have reopened for in-house services with limited attendance. Sanctuaries provide seating in every other pew to meeting social distancing requirements. Churches have foregone bulletins and other print handouts and provided drop boxes for tithes and offerings 

Elbow-bumping and fistbumping have replaced handshaking as a means of personally greeting non-family members. 

Perhaps the toughest protocol is the one limiting family member visits to patients in hospitals and a novisitation policy in nursing homes.  

While athletic competition at high school and college levels is being allowed in the 2020-21 school year, attendance is limited to ensure social distancing.  

Empty seats were filled with fan cutouts to give the impression of a full house at the NCAA National Basketball Tournament in Indianapolis, Ind.  

A return to normalcy now appears to be getting its biggest boost from anti-virus inoculations being given throughout the country. I hope it will all be over by the end of 2021. 

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In the community: Highflying fun

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