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Hartselle Enquirer

A look back at good eating

In this era of fast-food and take-out dining healthy eating is a goal not always easily achieved. In some respects our ancestors ate more nutritiously than we did—in others not so well.

July 17, 1896–There is more money to be made out of a berry patch well cultivated and properly managed than is to be made out of any other sort of crop that the farmers of Morgan County are in the habit of raising. This is illustrated beyond a doubt by the experience of Jerry Anderson, an industrious and intelligent farmer about a mile and a half from Raleigh Springs who will make in the neighborhood of $300 off a trifle over an acre of land covered with beautiful and healthful raspberries.

Oct. 11, 1909–Lots of seed is being sold to the planters by dealers here. There will be more wheat sown in this county this fall than for many years past. The people are determined to raise their bread at home. It will be much better for them than industry-processed loaves. There is also a considerable quantity of oats being sown. People are learning how to make oatmeal cereal from what they normally would feed to their horses and mules.

June 1, 1909–Several crates of Early peaches have been shipped from here this week. The peaches that are being shipped now are the Early, three weeks ahead of the Elbertas. The Elberta crop this season will be the largest in the history of peach orchards here. The strawberry crop has been on for the past month, and the vines are still blooming, giving every promise of a bountiful crop. Several acres of cabbage are being marketed also, and there are many Irish potatoes to harvest. The people are beginning to pay more attention each year to the value of adding these small fruits and vegetables to their regular diets in generous amounts.

July 11, 1909–A week of pretty weather has given the planters new hope and inspiration, and as a result the town has been practically deserted this week by farmers. Crops have come out wonderfully during the week and planting is still going on. Much land is being sown in winter peas. These peas are one of the most nutritious leguminous vegetables and provide numerous health benefits.

July 11, 1917–Local tomato growers–and they are legion–are very much distressed because the tomato orchards are being visited by an alien enemy, the exact nature of which has not been discovered. Many full grown vines, that are already bearing fruit, are dying in all parts of Morgan County. Experts working out of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute are seeking to identify and eliminate this unknown pest. Specialists in home economics at API have previously pointed out that tomatoes in the diet provide good sources of Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Niacin, Vitamin B6, Foliate, Magnesium, Phosphorous, and Copper. They are also a good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, potassium, and manganese. These nutritional values highlight the importance of solving the current problem with the tomato crop.

Feb. 24, 1922—General store proprietor S. E. Stewart is currently selling a dozen beautiful, healthy apples for fifteen cents. He is a firm believer in the old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”

Aug. 11, 1938–Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bishop had the prize winning collard patch this year. There are 250 collards in the patch and they have attained remarkable size. Collards—cooked, drained, without salt—have great nutritional value. They are richest in Vitamin K, but also provide more than 300 percent of the recommended dietary consumption of foods containing Vitamin E.

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Hartselle graduate creates product for amputees 

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Tigers roar in Athens soccer win

Danville

Local family raises Autism awareness through dirt racing  

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Three Hartselle students named National Merit finalists  

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Morgan chief deputy graduates from FBI National Academy

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Hartselle students collect food for good cause 

Falkville

Falkville to hold town-wide yard sale next month

At a Glance

Danville man dies after vehicle leaves Hudson Memorial Bridge 

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Clif Knight, former Hartselle mayor, Enquirer writer, dies at 88

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Hartselle Utilities reminds community April is safe digging month 

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Teen powerhouse invited to compete in international strongman event

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Azaleas: An Alabama beauty 

Decatur

Master Gardeners plant sale returns in April

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Morgan leaders honored at annual banquet

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Local students selected for 2024 Blackburn Institute Class

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Hartselle sophomore represents Civil Air Patrol in D.C.  

Editor's picks

Hartselle council hires architect for new fire station, library and event center

At a Glance

PowerGrid Services in Hartselle evacuated for bomb threat

Morgan County

20 under 40: Trey Chowning

Falkville

20 under 40: TJ Holmes

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20 under 40: Spencer Bell

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20 under 40: Shelby Keenum

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20 under 40: Rachel Howard

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20 under 40: Mary Virgina Halbrooks

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