• 75°
Hartselle Enquirer

RC Cola and a Moon Pie

Soon kids will be back in school and making choices about what they will eat for lunch.

Will they be doling out the cash by the day or week and eating from a dietetically-sanctioned school lunchroom menu? Or will a finicky eater’s choices rule in favor of a home-prepared lunch?

I didn’t have a choice at the two schools I attended as a first- through fifth-grader. Neither school had a lunchroom.

Each student was responsible for bringing his or her own lunch. These lunches consisted mostly of foods that were produced, prepared and served from the family dinner table – namely biscuits filled with eggs, ham, butter and jam.

Lunches were packed both individually and jointly, in cases where two or more siblings attended the same school. Students with lunch boxes had the benefit of bringing a bottle of fresh milk.

Barfield Junior High School made a giant step in food service in 1946 when it opened a lunchroom and began offering a light lunch for 10 cents. A peanut butter and jelly sandwich, along with an apple, orange or banana, went to each student.

The next year, hot food items were added, and my three siblings and I brought fresh vegetables from the farm to help pay for our lunches.

The novelty of eating a hot meal in the school cafeteria had worn thin, however, by the time I reached the 10th grade at Lineville High School. The over-cooked veggies lacked the home-cooked quality we were used to, and some of my friends and I decided we would hunt a lunchtime alternate.

A school policy allowed students to go off campus to eat lunch provided they returned to campus in time for their next class. We found we had enough time during lunch break to go downtown, grab a bite to eat and return to campus in time for our first afternoon class.

With a quarter each to spend, we were able to buy a cold RC Cola and a Moon Pie or a four-count package of cinnamon rolls. While we were eating, the owner of an adjacent feed and seed store permitted us to sit on sacks of feed in his store.

This combination was more than enough food to fill our empty tummies and keep us going for the rest of the day.

 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle bomb threat deemed hoax

Editor's picks

At 90, Carl Winton keeps on trucking

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle man with rare genetic condition headed to Grand Ole Opry

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

College Street Players to present Newsies: The Broadway Musical

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

HU adjusts rates for water, sewer and natural gas services

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Town Council helps Priceville Elementary furnish school 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle City Schools hires three math coaches for 2024-25 school year 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Crestline students rock Alabama Stock Market Games, poster contest

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

New EMA director worries and plans for a living

Falkville

Jonna’s journey: Local woman battles Glioblastoma with unyielding faith 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Sheriff’s Office opens applications for 2024 youth academy

Brewer

MCS Technology Park to host STEAM summer camp for middle school students 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Bridging the gap: Hartselle Historical Society launches guided walk downtown bringing history to life

Falkville

Storm shelter companies see increase in calls for installation

Falkville

Morgan County rabies clinic to be held June 1

Eva

Community class reunion celebrates Morgan schools

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hats off: Class of 2024 graduates from Hartselle High School

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

City adjusts garbage routes for Memorial Day

Falkville

Larry Madison has been a pillar in Falkville for four decades

Hartselle

Hartselle trio nominated for two K-LOVE awards

Hartselle

Hartselle students chosen to attend Girls State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Kiwanis Club continues scholarly legacy with annual golf tournament

Editor's picks

Heartbreaking finish: Hartselle comes up a run short in state baseball finals

Decatur

Fallen Morgan County officers remembered, families honored  

x