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Hartselle Enquirer

A dangerous game

The NBA playoffs have been very physical this year with a few injuries taking place within the last few days during the conference finals.

This physicality is a vital part of sports, and it is one of the most exciting aspects of any match-up. An abundance of injuries is simply a chance that players take.

I think basketball seems to be one of the most injury-striken sports today because the season spans about eight months with multiple games each week. Players are staying in the league for much later and waiting to retire closer to 40 years old. It’s also a very physical sport with no regulation safety equipment required.

Basketball is arguably not the most physical sport, but there have been a few memorable injuries lately.

Kyle Korver of the Atlanta Hawks suffered a season-ending high ankle sprain May 22 after fighting for a loose ball with Matthew Dellavedova of the Clevalnd Cavaliers. He is expected to need surgery.

Just Monday night, Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors suffered a head contusion when he tumbled over Houston Rocket Trevor Ariza attempting to block a shot. Curry was able to return to the game later, but his injury was a close call.

Athletes of all sports and levels know that injuries are a possibility when they sign up. Hopefully each athlete will take on the responsibility of making sure they play in a way that is safe to themselves, their teammates and their opponents.

Of course injuries are going to happen even in the most careful situations, but I think leagues should take necessary steps to make sure players are safe.

Targeting rules are in effect in NCAA football to protect defenseless players, and several other leagues have guidelines and protocols for when injured players can return to the field or court.

As frustrating as these rules can be, I think some sort of safety regulation is necessary to keep our beloved athletes and teams playing.

Sports just wouldn’t be the same without the big hits and plays, but I think recklessness should be avoided and kept to a minimum as much as possible so we can continue to enjoy our favorite pastimes.

Joy Haynes is a staff writer for the Hartselle Enquirer.

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