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Council says no to lifestyle center

With the council deciding to nix the lifestyle center, the city still must decide whether it will replace, repair or close its 35-year-old pool. | File

The City of Hartselle will not be building a $13 million lifestyle/wellness center in the near future.

With a 3-1 vote, the City Council told Mayor Dwight Tankersley to stop researching the possibility of building the proposed facility. Instead, the council must now decide the fate of its ailing city pool, which will likely require either major repairs or replacement at the end of this year’s season.

Councilman Mark Mizell, who cast the decisive vote in favor of moving forward with the center at the June 14 meeting, changed his mind and made a motion to stop the project.

“It’s a good idea and it’s a good plan, but it’s just not the right time,” he said at Tuesday’s council meeting. “After weighing all of the options, I just don’t think we can afford it right now. It just wasn’t right to ask an architect to make drawings and renderings of something we’re not going to move forward with.”

Councilman Bill Smelser reiterated his position from the last council meeting, saying that he is still in favor of the center.

“I still feel this is a golden opportunity to do something like this for our community,” Smelser said. “I believe we could have built it for a lot less than $13 million for a facility like Cullman.”

Council President Kenny Thompson and Councilman Don Hall both voted to stop the project. Councilman Tom Chappell, who voted to move forward with the center at the last meeting, was not present at Tuesday’s meeting.

Thompson said he is in favor of building a new aquatics facility to continue that service to the community.

“I’m in favor of building a new pool, maybe with an indoor pool as well,” Thompson said. “I’m not in favor of spending money to repair the pool. We’ve already put too much money into repairing it. I’d like to see us build a new pool.”

Hall said he was in favor of keeping the pool open whether it meant repairing or replacing it. Smelser also felt that the city should build a new pool.

However, Mizell said the city should consider closing the pool after the pool runs its course.

“I don’t think we should continue to repair that pool,” Mizell said. “I think we should let it run its course and close the pool for good when we can’t use it anymore.”

No decision has been made on the pool as of Tuesday’s meeting. The council may take the issue up again at its next meeting on July 12.

Brent Maze
Hartselle Enquirer
The City of Hartselle will not be building a $13 million lifestyle/wellness center in the near future.
With a 3-1 vote, the City Council told Mayor Dwight Tankersley to stop researching the possibility of building the proposed facility. Instead, the council must now decide the fate of its ailing city pool, which will likely require either major repairs or replacement at the end of this year’s season.
Councilman Mark Mizell, who cast the decisive vote in favor of moving forward with the center at the June 14 meeting, changed his mind and made a motion to stop the project.
“It’s a good idea and it’s a good plan, but it’s just not the right time,” he said at Tuesday’s council meeting. “After weighing all of the options, I just don’t think we can afford it right now. It just wasn’t right to ask an architect to make drawings and renderings of something we’re not going to move forward with.”
Councilman Bill Smelser reiterated his position from the last council meeting, saying that he is still in favor of the center.
“I still feel this is a golden opportunity to do something like this for our community,” Smelser said. “I believe we could have built it for a lot less than $13 million for a facility like Cullman.”
Council President Kenny Thompson and Councilman Don Hall both voted to stop the project. Councilman Tom Chappell, who voted to move forward with the center at the last meeting, was not present at Tuesday’s meeting.
Thompson said he is in favor of building a new aquatics facility to continue that service to the community.
“I’m in favor of building a new pool, maybe with an indoor pool as well,” Thompson said. “I’m not in favor of spending money to repair the pool. We’ve already put too much money into repairing it. I’d like to see us build a new pool.”
Hall said he was in favor of keeping the pool open whether it meant repairing or replacing it. Smelser also felt that the city should build a new pool.
However, Mizell said the city should consider closing the pool after the pool runs its course.
“I don’t think we should continue to repair that pool,” Mizell said. “I think we should let it run its course and close the pool for good when we can’t use it anymore.”
No decision has been made on the pool as of Tuesday’s meeting. The council may take the issue up again at its next meeting on July 12.

Brent MazeHartselle Enquirer
The City of Hartselle will not be building a $13 million lifestyle/wellness center in the near future.With a 3-1 vote, the City Council told Mayor Dwight Tankersley to stop researching the possibility of building the proposed facility. Instead, the council must now decide the fate of its ailing city pool, which will likely require either major repairs or replacement at the end of this year’s season.Councilman Mark Mizell, who cast the decisive vote in favor of moving forward with the center at the June 14 meeting, changed his mind and made a motion to stop the project.“It’s a good idea and it’s a good plan, but it’s just not the right time,” he said at Tuesday’s council meeting. “After weighing all of the options, I just don’t think we can afford it right now. It just wasn’t right to ask an architect to make drawings and renderings of something we’re not going to move forward with.”Councilman Bill Smelser reiterated his position from the last council meeting, saying that he is still in favor of the center.“I still feel this is a golden opportunity to do something like this for our community,” Smelser said. “I believe we could have built it for a lot less than $13 million for a facility like Cullman.”Council President Kenny Thompson and Councilman Don Hall both voted to stop the project. Councilman Tom Chappell, who voted to move forward with the center at the last meeting, was not present at Tuesday’s meeting.Thompson said he is in favor of building a new aquatics facility to continue that service to the community.“I’m in favor of building a new pool, maybe with an indoor pool as well,” Thompson said. “I’m not in favor of spending money to repair the pool. We’ve already put too much money into repairing it. I’d like to see us build a new pool.”Hall said he was in favor of keeping the pool open whether it meant repairing or replacing it. Smelser also felt that the city should build a new pool.However, Mizell said the city should consider closing the pool after the pool runs its course.“I don’t think we should continue to repair that pool,” Mizell said. “I think we should let it run its course and close the pool for good when we can’t use it anymore.”No decision has been made on the pool as of Tuesday’s meeting. The council may take the issue up again at its next meeting on July 12.

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