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Hartselle Enquirer

Snow can be fun but it’s not everyone’s cup of tea

“We’re out of school! It’s going to snow! We’re out of school! It’s going to snow!” within seconds of the announcement it became a song in our home. When it began to snow, my 8-year-old just about lost any semblance of sanity! That combined with the red Kool-Aid was almost enough to send him into orbit.
What’s incredibly funny was that the 8-year-old was up at the crack of dawn ready to play in the snow. While the teenagers, who were equally excited about the snow, were more than willing to wait a little while to enjoy it and slept late much to the frustration of the eight-year-old.
Next, was the fun of dressing and outfitting everyone. We have some cold weather gear left over from our exile in northern Indiana. (I call it that, because, being born and raised in southern Missouri, I never adjusted to the weather up there and was very happy to move south).Between what we have, layering up, and a couple hours of hearing: “No! I want those gloves!” “That hat’s mine!” and “These boots are definitely not the cutest things I’ve ever seen!” We finally had everyone dressed and outside playing. At which point, my husband turns to me and says, “Well, we finally have the house to ourselves.” He’s kidding. I think.
Snow days are fun and the fact that we get them so rarely makes it all the more special! Not like when we lived in northern Indiana. Let me explain, the first winter we were up there we did not see grass from mid-November to late March. Seriously! Adri, my oldest daughter who spent her first five years of life in southern Missouri, was very excited at the prospect of having snow to play in at anytime. Well, that was until she found out that she also had to go outside at recess everyday! The rule at the school she attended was: if it wasn’t below zero recess was still a go. Required school supplies included not only the traditional notebooks, folders, pencils, crayons, etc. also needed were snow pants, heavy coats, water proof gloves or mittens, snow boots, and a hat with ear covering!
At my first parent-teacher conference the teacher said, “Well, my only concern is that she isn’t getting very much recess time. We have an hour for lunch and recess. The students can go out as soon as the finish eating and get dressed.(Meaning putting on the aforementioned winter weather gear.) Adri is eats very slowly. She’s usually the last one out of the lunchroom, and then it takes her forever to get dressed. She’s only getting maybe 5 or 10 minutes of recess.”
I looked at the teacher wondering if she really did not understand what was happening and replied, “You do realize she really doesn’t want to go out, right?”
She looked back at me with this confused look and replied, “Why not?”
At this point I was wondering a little about this teacher’s sanity, “Because it’s cold! We’re from Southeast Missouri. We don’t go outside when it’s this cold. (It was 20 degrees with a wind chill of about 10 degrees!) Can’t she just stay in and read a book?”
The teacher was equally confused and asked, “You mean you all didn’t go outside to recess at school during the winter?”
Thinking I was making headway I said, “Well, no not if is was this cold and not if there was snow on the ground. We had inside recess.”
At this point the teacher just looked at me as if that was the stupidest thing she had ever heard and replied, “Well, she needs to go out and get fresh air and exercise. She must go out for at least 15 minutes.”
Knowing my daughter, I said, “Can she please just sit in the library and read? She won’t bother anyone. She really hates the cold.” The teacher informed me that she would learn to love it. I thought to myself, “I really doubt that, but OK!” Adri never did “learn to love it!” In fact, she would go out and stand right next to the playground teacher or sit on the steps of the school huddled down in her “winter weather gear.” When asked why she did not go play she would say, “Because it’s cold! I want to go in and read.” Her teachers in second and third grade let her stay in and read.
The occasional snow is awesome. I have to admit I was just as excited about the snow as the kids and speaking of that, I’ve got to go make some snowballs! I hope you have a great week!

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