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Hartselle Enquirer

It’s all local when it comes to politics

As a born and bred Southerner, I understand the obsession with college football. I’m even guilty of it myself (see previous columns on how I cannot watch big games due to severe cases of the nerves.)
However, I do find it disturbing that more people are aware of Cameron Newton’s statistics than the philosophies of those running for governor.
I know politics can be dry, even boring, certainly not as exciting as your favorite team celebrating a victory. But in the end, while it’s always fun to win a football game, it’s the “dry” actions of those politicians that most matter in your day-to-day life.
The most local of politics is the most important. In this most recent election, we’ve heard a lot about “battling the Washington machine,” or promises to “fight Obama and Pelosi.”
That makes for good rhetoric. However, what I’d rather hear about what those running for office are planning to do statewide or, better yet, locally. As the late Tip O’Neal said, all politics are local. It would be nice if some of our candidates remembered that during election season.
Remember – one of the greatest patriotic incidents in American history started as nothing more than a protest over the price of a cup of tea.
You can’t blame the politicians, however, without taking a look in the mirror. As I said, there are few people who take the time to learn the issues, analyze the candidates and make a well-reasoned choice.
It’s one thing to know who’s running for governor. It’s also important to know who wants to serve you as Secretary of State, State Treasurer and, especially, those vying to represent you in the State Legislature.
It’s also important to recognize that such a well-reasoned choice has more to do with the person than the party. It’s become fashionable of late to declare your allegiance with a particular party without giving thought to the actual candidates representing that party. Before either party starts waving their banner, such fault can be found in supporters of both parties, Republicans and Democrats.
Whomever you decide to support, I hope you take the time to learn more about the candidates and the issues. Then, armed with this knowledge, go out and vote on Nov. 2.
That’s the recipe for a winning game.

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