• 61°
Hartselle Enquirer

Pancakes prompt holey situation

By Staff
Leada DeVaney, Editor
My 4-year-old nephew Collier was sitting at my kitchen table on Sunday morning, fork in one hand, spoon in the other.
He and his brother, Isaac, decided to spend the night with Aunt Le-Le, mainly because my mother was staying at my house and they knew they would be spoiled silly.
Earlier that morning, Collier had informed me he wanted chocolate chip pancakes for breakfast.
"My dad makes those," he said.
I assured him I, too, could make chocolate chip pancakes. Even better, I told him, is that I would let him have chocolate milk with his chocolate-chip pancakes because I knew he would like it and because I could send him home before his sugar overdose prompted him to scale the walls.
I've made lots of pancakes in my life, everything from plain and the traditional blueberry to ones decorated with mini M&Ms. So, as Collier sat at the table wearing his Superman pajamas and a big grin, I started to cook.
In about 15 minutes, the pancakes were done. I had poured the chocolate milk, put a few pieces of sausage on the table (they don't make chocolate sausage, I told Collier) and even found the syrup for the pancakes.
My older nephew, Isaac, dug right in. Collier looked at me funny.
"These don't look like my dad's pancakes," he said. "These have holes in them."
Holes? Where are there holes?
"There aren't any holes in the pancakes," I replied. "They are good. Eat."
He picked up a pancake and pointed to the edge.
"See?" he said. "There are holes. They are bumpy. My dad's pancakes are round."
He had me there. My pancakes weren't round. They really weren't any shape at all, unless you consider blob a shape.
I went back to the plate where the pancakes were piled up. Digging through the stack, I found one small pancake that I hoped would pass as round.
"Here's a round one," I said. "No holes."
I moved the obviously offensive pancakes off Collier's plate and put the round one down.
"I don't have any dipping sauce," Collier said.
"Dipping sauce? You're not eating chicken nuggets," I said. "What's dipping sauce?"
He looked around for the bottle of syrup. Following Collier's instructions, I poured some on the plate but not on the pancakes. He ate a few bites and then looked at me.
"I like my dad's pancakes better," he said.
"Drink your chocolate milk," I said. "I bet I can find a cookie somewhere around here."
For at least a moment, Superman was satisfied.

News

HIS students help clean up effort at Mt. Tabor Cemetery 

News

Lovely landscape

News

Morgan buys SUVs to transport seniors, deliver meals

News

Morgan County Sheriff’s Office to let citizens behind the scenes with academy  

News

Morgan teen exhibits grand champion at Alabama National Fair

News

Murder-for-hire defendant seeks bond

MULTIMEDIA-FRONT PAGE

Stadthagen supports

News

SALUTE

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Second grade students in Hartselle honor heroes

News

Alabama DHR accepting applications for next round of child care bonuses 

At a Glance

Vinemont man killed in single-vehicle crash

At a Glance

Littlest Christmas Tree Farm opens Friday

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Marching on: Pride of Priceville has ‘stellar’ season  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle scores A on state report card, down two points from 2018

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle man sentenced to 179 years in prison for sex crimes  

At a Glance

‘Have a Hart’ information session to be held Dec. 2 

brewer

Cotaco students celebrate Thanksgiving with school-wide parade

Hartselle

Divided Hartselle school board picks Clayton for next superintendent 

At a Glance

Historical Society plans 2023 lunch, learn series

At a Glance

Santa’s Workshop Vintage Market returns this weekend

Hartselle

Superintendent finalists interviewed for vacant position  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Junior High honors veterans at annual program

Hartselle

Christmas in the Park returns Dec. 3

Morgan Countian

Cotaco service center opens for county business  

x